Book Review: Dust by Patricia Cornwell

Dust (Kay Scarpetta #21)

Massachusetts Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta has just returned from working one of the worst mass murders in U.S. history when she’s awakened at an early hour by Detective Pete Marino.

A body, oddly draped in an unusual cloth, has just been discovered inside the sheltered gates of MIT and it’s suspected the identity is that of missing computer engineer Gail Shipton, last seen the night before at a trendy Cambridge bar. It appears she’s been murdered, mere weeks before the trial of her $100 million lawsuit against her former financial managers, and Scarpetta doubts it’s a coincidence. She also fears the case may have a connection with her computer genius niece, Lucy.

At a glance there is no sign of what killed Gail Shipton, but she’s covered with a fine dust that under ultraviolet light fluoresces brilliantly in three vivid colors, what Scarpetta calls a mineral fingerprint. Clearly the body has been posed with chilling premeditation that is symbolic and meant to shock, and Scarpetta has reason to worry that the person responsible is the Capital Murderer, whose most recent sexual homicides have terrorized Washington, D.C. Stunningly, Scarpetta will discover that her FBI profiler husband, Benton Wesley, is convinced that certain people in the government, including his boss, don’t want the killer caught.

In Dust, Scarpetta and her colleagues are up against a force far more sinister than a sexual predator who fits the criminal classification of a “spectacle killer.” The murder of Gail Shipton soon leads deep into the dark world of designer drugs, drone technology, organized crime, and shocking corruption at the highest levels.

With unparalleled high-tension suspense and the latest in forensic technology, Patricia Cornwell once again proves her exceptional ability to surprise—and to thrill.

Review:
This is my first time reading a novel my Patricia Cornwell and I was excited because I’d heard great things about the Kay Scarpetta series. Unfortunately, this book was a let down for me.
The characters are all well established, have a history with each other, and a pattern of behaviour, which is fine. Old tensions and rivalries are brought in quite a bit.
This novel takes place over the course of one day and yet there is very little actual action. Scarpetta spends a lot of time going over things in her head, so much time that things get very repetitive. And I mean really repetitive. I almost didn’t make it through the book. She explains old rivalries between the characters several times, she looks at the evidence, figures it out, talks about it, explains it, then thinks about it again.
And, I have to say, that it bugged me that Scarpetta was hungry all the time but barely ever ate. And that they were sometimes in a hurry, but it would take two chapters of thoughts and contemplation before they actually left the room.
Right from the start, Scarpetta’s husband and FBI profiler, Benton, seems to know there’s a cover up and who’s doing it and much of the rest of the book is finding ways to use the evidence against him.
It is obvious that the author knows a lot about forensic science and all of the techniques and gadgets and that was interesting, however, the story was so slow and repetitive that author knowledge couldn’t compensate.
Share this:

Book Review: The Bone Labyrinth

The Bone Labyrinth (Sigma Force #11)

A war is coming, a battle that will stretch from the prehistoric forests of the ancient past to the cutting-edge research labs of today, all to reveal a true mystery buried deep within our DNA, a mystery that will leave readers changed forever . . .

In this groundbreaking masterpiece of ingenuity and intrigue that spans 50,000 years in human history, New York Times bestselling author James Rollins takes us to mankind’s next great leap.

But will it mark a new chapter in our development . . . or our extinction?

In the remote mountains of Croatia, an archaeologist makes a strange discovery:  a subterranean Catholic chapel, hidden for centuries, holds the bones of a Neanderthal woman. In the same cavern system, elaborate primitive paintings tell the story of an immense battle between tribes of Neanderthals and monstrous shadowy figures. Who is this mysterious enemy depicted in these ancient drawings and what do the paintings mean?

Before any answers could be made, the investigative team is attacked, while at the same time, a bloody assault is made upon a primate research center outside of Atlanta. How are these events connected? Who is behind these attacks?  The search for the truth will take Commander Gray Pierce of Sigma Force 50,000 years into the past. As he and Sigma trace the evolution of human intelligence to its true source, they will be plunged into a cataclysmic battle for the future of humanity that stretches across the globe . . . and beyond.

With the fate of our future at stake, Sigma embarks on its most harrowing odyssey ever—a breathtaking quest that will take them from ancient tunnels in Ecuador that span the breadth of South America to a millennia-old necropolis holding the bones of our ancestors. Along the way, revelations involving the lost continent of Atlantis will reveal true mysteries tied to mankind’s first steps on the moon. In the end, Gray Pierce and his team will face to their greatest threat: an ancient evil, resurrected by modern genetic science, strong enough to bring about the end of man’s dominance on this planet.

Only this time, Sigma will falter—and the world we know will change forever.

Review:
I really wanted to like this book — it hit a lot of the right buttons for me. I was in the mood for a thriller, the story involves archaeology and Atlantis, there is action and adventure, and Rollins is a highly recommended, prolific author. But, despite all of my expectations, I only found the book OK.
The characters were good, the kind of tough guys you would expect in a thriller. I like that not all of the tough guys were “guys” — some were women too.
And you can’t fault Rollins on his research. It is clear from the early pages that he has researched all of the science and archaeology behind the book. That part really was interesting, thinking of the possibilities of Adam and Eve, a historical leap of intellect, and the presence of Atlantis. Great stuff.
But then there were the other things. I actually felt uncomfortable reading parts of this book. The big antagonist was basically all of China. There was no redeeming quality of anything Chinese. The whole country was depicted as inhumane, cut-throat, and immoral. I know there needs to be bad guys, but vilifying an entire country is not OK.
The writing, for the most part, was good. There did need to be more editing, however as there were a few occasions when a paragraph or description was repeated practically word for word within several pages. And much of Rollins’ research was presented in an info dump format — a character would go to the library and research then come back and tell everyone everything for several pages.
And, I couldn’t figure out from a story point of view, why Sigma Force took the people they were supposed to be protecting to Ecuador and put them in harm’s way. There needed to be a better rationale for going against their assignment of keeping these people safe than curiosity. From the book point of view, it was interesting and they learned a lot, but from a plot point of view the officers of Sigma Force were not doing their job by putting their charges in life threatening danger when there was no pressing need.
Overall, there was a lot to enjoy in The Bone Labyrinth, but I’m not sure I’ll be picking up another Sigma Force book soon.
Share this:

Summer 2017 Newsletter

Hello Everyone,

Happy Summer!!! I hope everyone is well and safe. Here in BC we have been hit with hot weather and forest fires, but I am proud to be part of a city that has stepped up to welcome thousands who have been displaced from their homes.The huge outpouring of kindness is inspiring.

Kick-Butt Princess Book Sale

I am excited to be taking part in a huge, multi author book sale for the week of July 17-21. Click on the image above to be taken to a page of authors who have written kick butt princess books, all of which are on sale for $.99 or are free. Now is the time to stock up on your summer reading of amazing, strong heroines who do the saving. You’ll find Prophecy there for $.99. I can’t wait to check them out myself.

Art in the Park:

On Canada Day, my writing group Books in the Belfry (you can find out more about us here on our web page), were fortunate enough to have a booth at our local Art in the Park. It was a fantastic, sunny day, filled with people coming to talk with us about books and writing. Thanks to everyone who stopped by.

Betrayed:

I’ve been spending most of my writing time these days polishing off my adult novel set in ancient Greece during the time of the Trojan War, Betrayed. I really love this book and can’t wait to finish it — it is about Queen Clytemnestra, twin sister to Helen of Troy. It combines my love of Greek myth with a phenomenal heroine and lots of strong emotions. It’s been a bit of a roller coaster to write, but well worth it.

New Writing Practice:

For those of you who are writers, I wanted to share a new writing practice that I’ve adopted that I am having some fun with. It is called “copywriting.” Basically, before writing every day, I sit and physically copy out a page or two from someone else’s work in an effort to learn new ways of writing. It’s actually something writer’s have been doing for a long time and something painters do — copy the masters. You can read my blog post about it here. I was in the mood for Thoreau’s essay On Civil Disobedience, so I’m starting with that. I also think it would be a fantastic way to get into the rhythm of poetry. So far I find it a great calming and centering exercise.

What I’m Reading:

Besides loading up my Kindle with Kick-Butt Princess books, I’ve been branching out in my reading this summer and I’m in the mood for thrillers. I’ve just started The Bone Labyrinth by James Rollins and it’s amazing so far. Does anyone have any other good recommendations — not too gory, though.

Well, that’s it for now. Hope you are enjoying your summer,
Take care,
Coreena McBurnie

 

Subscribe to my seasonal newsletter

* indicates required


Email Format


Share this:

Author Interview: Alex D. T. Baker

Today I am happy to introduce sci-fi author, Alex D. T. Baker, to my blog.

100_1530Tell us about your books. Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?

I have three books out right now: Soul Burn and Bloodlust (parts 1 and 2 of the Frailty series) and Symbiont. All three are in the sci-fi genre.

The Frailty books have one foot in the Thrill/Suspense genre that contains a little bit of everything: serial killers, a slightly sexually demented detective, demons, and vampire-like people I call Blood-dealers.

Symbiont is the one I am promoting right now. Even though it’s not the most recent work, it is the one I am gearing up to do a follow-up for, so I would like to get as much exposure for it as I can. As for what it is about, here’s the synopsis, which I think sums it up nicely:

When Apoehl, the last of a race of benevolent and powerful aliens, comes to Earth to escape the war mongering Chilk, he is forced to abandon his failing body. To survive he must merge his life force with a human.
Jennifer has become the latest in a long line of hosts. Now she finds herself endowed with inhuman energy, in possession of the memories and strengths of those before her, and caught in a war.
It falls to Sam, the grizzled retired Marine now in command of a covert Government agency, and Paz, Sam’s mountain-sized right-hand man, to protect her from Brett, who craves the power for himself and will do whatever it takes to get it.
But as Jennifer fights against her past and questions the person she is becoming, the greatest struggle could be with herself.
Together, Jennifer, Sam, Paz, and Brett will unfold and build the story of the conflict that will change them all and decide Apoehl’s fate.
Read more

Share this: