On Re-Reading The Chamber of Secrets

On Re-Reading The Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter #2)

The Dursleys were so mean and hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But just as he’s packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

And strike it does. For in Harry’s second year at Hogwarts, fresh torments and horrors arise, including an outrageously stuck-up new professor, Gilderoy Lockhart, a spirit named Moaning Myrtle who haunts the girls’ bathroom, and the unwanted attentions of Ron Weasley’s younger sister, Ginny. But each of these seem minor annoyances when the real trouble begins, and someone, or something, starts turning Hogwarts students to stone. Could it be Draco Malfoy, a more poisonous rival than ever? Could it possibly be Hagrid, whose mysterious past is finally told? Or could it be the one everyone at Hogwarts most suspects: Harry Potter himself?

My Thoughts on Re-Reading (not really a review…)

I can’t even remember how long ago I first read this book — I think it was close to the time when it came out, and I haven’t re-read it since. But this year my local library is doing a Book Geeks Book Club for adults and we are reading all of the Harry Potter books. Last month was The Chamber of Secrets.

Again, I was blown away by how much pre-planning Rowling did when she wrote her books. She really knew where they were going as was able to pepper in details that become important in later books.

One of the things I loved about this book was the change in tone. The Philosopher’s Stone was full of discovery and magic and everything (pretty much) was wonderful. But The Chamber of Secrets shows a darker side to the wizarding world: we find out about house elves, Azkaban, Kncckturn Alley, the prejudice against mudbloods and squibs, and the history of the Chamber of Secrets. This is also a book where Harry doesn’t feel at home at Hogwarts anymore. He is miserable at home and now he is miserable at school with people avoiding him and making fun of him. This is a fantastic turn of events and adds more depth to the wizarding world.

I thoroughly enjoyed re-reading this book and can see again how kids (and grown ups) fall in love with this series — and how current it is twenty years later.

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