Book Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Parts One and Two (Harry Potter, #8)

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

Review:
I was so excited to get this book when it came out and I wanted to love it so much, but I have to say I didn’t. I didn’t exactly hate it either because it was missing that Harry Potter magic that we’ve all come to expect from this series.
It was fun to delve into a play, something I hadn’t done in quite awhile, which also made it a quick read. I enjoyed visualizing what the scenes would look like on the stage — and according to the stage directions, the play must be spectacular.
But I did find the story lacking. I don’t want to spoil anything, but the whole story was missing a major villain, someone the reader could really hate, someone along the lines of Voldemort. There was an antagonist, but they just didn’t seem evil enough for the Harry Potter universe.
The other strange thing was the lack of magic.
Also, I wasn’t thrilled with the relationship between Harry and his son. It just felt wrong. Harry knew what it was like not to fit in and be bullied and yet he seemed to have very little sympathy for his own son.
My favourite characters in the story, by far, is Draco Malfoy, followed closely by Ron Weasley.
Overall, I did enjoy The Cursed Child, but found it lacking at the same time.

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Summer Newsletter & Sale

Hello Everyone,

I know it’s been a little while, but the end of the school year caught up with me. I was also getting ready to sell my book and some felting I’ve been working on at our local Art in the Park — an annual event here in Kamloops on Canada Day. It was super fun. Here’s a picture from my booth.

Working on Betrayed

As much as I love Antigone, I am finding that I need a break from her, so I am going to spend the next little while working on another novel I have in the works called Betrayed (working title). This one is most definitely aimed at adults and is about Clytemnestra, who is the sister of Helen of Troy and was married to Agamemnon (the leader of the Greeks in the Trojan War). She’s an interesting character who is villianized in most of ancient literature because she took a consort while her husband was away at the Trojan War, then killed him upon his return. But, she does have her reasons… Her story has a lot of fantastic avenues to explore. Read more

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Book Review: Six of Crows

Six of Crows (Six of Crows #1)

Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can’t pull it off alone…

A convict with a thirst for revenge.

A sharpshooter who can’t walk away from a wager.

A runaway with a privileged past.

A spy known as the Wraith.

A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums.

A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes.

Kaz’s crew are the only ones who might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

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Author Interview: Laurisa White Reyes

Today I am happy to introduce author Laurisa White Reyes. Her new book is The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction and sounds great — and I got a chance to review her book, which you can read here.
P10 (2)Tell us about your book(s). Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?
The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction had its start when I taught creative writing to middle grade and high school students. I wasn’t thrilled with the writing books available for kids at the time, so I created my own curriculum. Fast forward a decade. I’ve written and published several novels for young readers, including Spark Award winner The Storytellers. As an author, I’ve the opportunity to visit over 60 schools and speak with hundreds of students about writing and creativity. I decided that I wanted to reach out to young writers everywhere, and The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction was the result.
Geared toward kids aged 10 – 17, the book is not just for those who already love writing, but it is also designed to spark an interest in reading and writing in kids whose academic strengths and talents lie elsewhere. By introducing the six fundamental building blocks of storytelling in a fun and easy-to-“get” manner, kids discover the storyteller that lies within each of us. Their confidence and enthusiasm grow as they see the inner-workings of their very own stories grow.

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