Book Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Parts One and Two (Harry Potter, #8)

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

Review:
I was so excited to get this book when it came out and I wanted to love it so much, but I have to say I didn’t. I didn’t exactly hate it either because it was missing that Harry Potter magic that we’ve all come to expect from this series.
It was fun to delve into a play, something I hadn’t done in quite awhile, which also made it a quick read. I enjoyed visualizing what the scenes would look like on the stage — and according to the stage directions, the play must be spectacular.
But I did find the story lacking. I don’t want to spoil anything, but the whole story was missing a major villain, someone the reader could really hate, someone along the lines of Voldemort. There was an antagonist, but they just didn’t seem evil enough for the Harry Potter universe.
The other strange thing was the lack of magic.
Also, I wasn’t thrilled with the relationship between Harry and his son. It just felt wrong. Harry knew what it was like not to fit in and be bullied and yet he seemed to have very little sympathy for his own son.
My favourite characters in the story, by far, is Draco Malfoy, followed closely by Ron Weasley.
Overall, I did enjoy The Cursed Child, but found it lacking at the same time.

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Book Review: The Name of the Wind

name of the windThe Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle #1)

Told in Kvothe’s own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen.

The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature.

A high-action story written with a poet’s hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

Review:
 I can see why so many people love this book. When I heard about it recently, I tried to take it out of the library, but the waiting list was months, if not over a year long. Then a friend lent me a copy and I dove into his huge volume.
And it was so much fun.
The Name of the Wind is the first day of Kvothe telling the story of his life. We get to hear all about his childhood and young adult years — his adventures and and glimmerings into background for some of his famous and infamous deeds.
Kvothe’s world is one of magic and fantasy, and where the harsh realities of a young boy on his own tug at our heartstrings. I immediately loved Kvothe and his mysterious character.
Then, there is Rothfuss’ writing. He has an amazing way with words. I also found it somewhat ironic that he could succinctly and vividly describe things in a few words, yet this is such a long book.
I’d easily recommend this book to anyone who enjoys an action packed fantasy, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Book 2 to see where the adventure leads.

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Author Interview: D.R. Shoultz

Today I am happy to have author D.R. Shoultz on my blog.

drHello D.R. Can you describe yourself in a few sentences.

I grew up in a small, Midwestern town, the son of a self-employed home builder. I was a better than average student and an athlete in high school, but quickly became a small fish in a big pond at college. After graduating with degrees in education and mathematics, I spent 32 years in corporate America where I traveled the world and uprooted my wife, son and daughter eight times. Shortly after retirement, I lost my beautiful wife of 33 years in a traffic accident. I spent the next several years finding myself. After a long-distance relationship, I married Claudia in 2012, who not only became my wife, she became my writing partner and editor. We live in the Blue Ridge Mountains with our rescue dog, Milo. Our interests include reading, writing, hiking with Milo, golfing, drinking wine at sunset, and spending time with friends and family. Read more

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Book Review: Six of Crows

Six of Crows (Six of Crows #1)

Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can’t pull it off alone…

A convict with a thirst for revenge.

A sharpshooter who can’t walk away from a wager.

A runaway with a privileged past.

A spy known as the Wraith.

A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums.

A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes.

Kaz’s crew are the only ones who might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

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