Book Review: Trace of Evil

Trace of EvilTrace of Evil (Natalie Lockhart #1) by Alice Blanchard

A riveting mystery that introduces a bold and audacious rookie detective assigned to hunt for a killer who is haunted by the past in this gripping murder case…

Natalie Lockhart always knew she was going to be a cop. A rookie detective on the Burning Lake police force, she was raised on the wisdom of her chief-of-police father. These cases will haunt you if you let them. Grief doesn’t come with instructions.

But the one thing her father couldn’t teach her was how to handle loss. Natalie’s beloved sister was viciously murdered as a teenager, and she carries the scars deep in her heart. Although the killer was locked up, the trace evidence never added up, and Natalie can’t help wondering―is the past really behind her?

As the newest member on the force, Natalie is tasked with finding nine missing persons who’ve vanished off the face of the earth, dubbed “the Missing Nine.” One night, while following up on a new lead, she comes across a savage crime that will change everything.

Daisy Buckner―a popular schoolteacher, wife to a cop, and newly pregnant―lies dead on her kitchen floor. As Natalie hunts for Daisy’s killer in the wake of the town’s shock, her search leads to a string of strange clues―about the Missing Nine, about Daisy’s secret life, and reviving fresh doubts about her sister’s murder.

As the investigation deepens, Natalie’s every move risks far-reaching consequences―for the victims, for the town of Burning Lake, and for herself.

Spellbinding and gripping, Trace of Evil is a novel of twisting suspense that will leave you breathless.

Review:
The premise of this book was great and there was a lot that was interesting about it. However, I also found that for some reason, the book dragged a bit for me. There were a lot of story lines and they were interesting and the author wove it all together really well.
I even liked the characters. Natalie is interesting and tenacious. I loved her niece.
I think there was just a lot of “info dumping”. There were lots of long passages of telling background, instead of weaving it in. Also, there was a lot of repetition.
Still, this is a promising start to a detective series.
Thank you to Netgalley and Minotaur Books for the review copy.
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Book Review: Get a Life, Chloe Brown

Get a Life, Chloe Brown

(The Brown Sisters #1) by Talia Hibbert

Talia Hibbert, one of contemporary romance’s brightest new stars, delivers a witty, hilarious romantic comedy about a woman who’s tired of being “boring” and recruits her mysterious, sexy neighbor to help her experience new things—perfect for fans of Sally Thorne, Jasmine Guillory, and Helen Hoang.

Chloe Brown is a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list. After almost—but not quite—dying, she’s come up with seven directives to help her “Get a Life”, and she’s already completed the first: finally moving out of her glamourous family’s mansion. The next items?

Enjoy a drunken night out.
Ride a motorcycle.
Go camping.
Have meaningless but thoroughly enjoyable sex.
Travel the world with nothing but hand luggage.
And… do something bad.

But it’s not easy being bad, even when you’ve written step-by-step guidelines on how to do it correctly. What Chloe needs is a teacher, and she knows just the man for the job.Redford ‘Red’ Morgan is a handyman with tattoos, a motorcycle, and more sex appeal than ten-thousand Hollywood heartthrobs. He’s also an artist who paints at night and hides his work in the light of day, which Chloe knows because she spies on him occasionally. Just the teeniest, tiniest bit.

But when she enlists Red in her mission to rebel, she learns things about him that no spy session could teach her. Like why he clearly resents Chloe’s wealthy background. And why he never shows his art to anyone. And what really lies beneath his rough exterior…

Review:
I loved reading Get a Life, Chloe Brown. I do not often read romance but this one caught my eye — namely because it involves the types of characters that are often underrepresented in books.
The main character is Chloe Brown, who has an invisible disability and is in constant pain. She struggles to do things that most people would find easy or normal. After being in a situation where she could have been killed, Chloe decides to get a life and makes a list of things she wants to do.
I love Chloe and feel that her character was really well done. Her illness felt authentically portrayed and I loved her strange tenacity, for example climbing a tree to save a cat when it really was the last thing she should have done. It is interesting to watch her grow as she tries to get out of her comfort zone and do things that many people take for granted.
Red, the handyman at the apartment building she lives in, is also an engaging character with a past of his own. He is elusive about himself, and with good reason as he is suffering from a trauma of a different sort.
Even though there are some big issues being dealt with, the book is told in a romantic comedy type of way full of traditional tropes and sexual tension. In fact, the book is quite steamy.
This is an interesting take on traditional romance and I would highly recommend it if you like explicit sexual romance that is both light and inclusive. It is difficult to balance humour and big issues and inclusiveness, but Hibbert does a great job.
Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for a review copy of this book.
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Book Review: Flowers Over the Inferno

Flowers Over the Inferno (Teresa Battaglia #1) by Ilaria Tuti, Ekin Oklap (translator)

In a quiet village surrounded by ancient woods and the imposing Italian Alps, a man is found naked with his eyes gouged out. It is the first in a string of gruesome murders.

Superintendent Teresa Battaglia, a detective with a background in criminal profiling, is called to investigate. Battaglia is in her mid-sixties, her rank and expertise hard-won from decades of battling for respect in the male-dominated Italian police force. While she’s not sure she trusts the young city inspector assigned to assist her, she sees right away that this is no ordinary case: buried deep in these mountains are whispers of a dark and dangerous history, possibly tied to a group of eight-year-old children toward whom the killer seems to gravitate.

As Teresa inches closer to the truth, she must also confront the possibility that her body and mind, worn down by age and illness, may fail her before the chase is over.

Review:
I absolutely loved this book and already can’t wait for the next one in the series.
Teresa is a no nonsense police detective in Italy who has seen it all and has overcome the sexism of the police department. She is a brilliant profiler, but in this book, she comes across a murderer who can’t be profiled. She also experiences health problems and is starting to have issues with her memory, so she is against the clock to catch this unconventional killer.
Teresa is a fantastic character. I loved having someone older and relatable as the intelligent, sometimes short tempered, passionate police detective. She is determined and fallible, which makes her an interesting protagonist.
The mystery is unique and fascinating. There is an historical aspect to the book involving terrible Nazi experiments and that definitely added interest to the book.
Then there is the writing — even in translation this book is beautifully written, evoking the setting of the Italian Alps in the winter. I enjoyed just reading the great sentences and turns of phrases.
I also run a book box subscription that feature strong woman reads and this book was a no-brainer to add to one of our boxes. So far, our subscribers are also enjoying this book as well.
Thank you to Edelweiss+ and the publisher for a review copy of this book.
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Book Review: The Women’s War

The Women’s War (Women’s War #1) by Jenna Glass

In a high fantasy feminist epic, a revolutionary spell gives women the ability to control their own fertility—with consequences that rock their patriarchal society to its core.

When a nobleman’s first duty is to produce a male heir, women are treated like possessions and bargaining chips. But as the aftereffects of a world-altering spell ripple out physically and culturally, women at last have a bargaining chip of their own. And two women in particular find themselves at the crossroads of change.

Alys is the widowed mother of two teenage children, and the disinherited daughter of a king. Her existence has been carefully proscribed, but now she discovers a fierce talent not only for politics but also for magic—once deemed solely the domain of men. Meanwhile, in a neighboring kingdom, young Ellin finds herself unexpectedly on the throne after the sudden death of her grandfather the king and everyone else who stood ahead of her in the line of succession. Conventional wisdom holds that she will marry quickly, then quietly surrender the throne to her new husband…. Only, Ellin has other ideas.

The tensions building in the two kingdoms grow abruptly worse when a caravan of exiled women and their escort of disgraced soldiers stumbles upon a new source of magic in what was once uninhabitable desert. This new and revolutionary magic—which only women can wield—threatens to tear down what is left of the patriarchy. And the men who currently hold power will do anything to fight back.

Review:
I absolutely loved this book! I loved the fantasy and the magic and how it was used to explore the roles of women and men and the power between them.
When three generations of women perform a radical spell, they give women the ability to control their own fertility. The change takes place immediately and has far reaching consequences in a world where women are treated as commodities and are valued for the heirs they bear. This one change gives women new power and forces society to examine the patriarchy under which it has lived for generations.
Stories that make one change in the world and pushes to see the far reaching outcomes really appeal to me, and The Women’s War does not disappoint. Glass examines many aspects of how women have or gain power or how they lose it. Unfortunately, these situations are often terrible and violent and Glass chooses not to shy away from this, including some particularly terrible scenes (just so you are warned).
I also enjoyed the world that Glass created. It is rich, epic, detailed, and the characters are compelling. The magic and the elements it uses are wonderful and beautifully add to the story’s themes. I couldn’t wait to turn the pages to find out what the characters would do next. Alys and Ellin, two of the main characters, are each truly formidable in their own ways and I am eager to see what they do in the next book.
Thank you to Penguin Random House for a review copy of this book.
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