Book Review: Woman on the Edge

Woman on the Edge by Samantha M. Bailey

A moment on the platform changes two lives forever. But nothing is as it seems…

‘Take my baby.’

In a split second, Morgan’s life changes forever. A stranger hands her a baby, then jumps in front of a train.

Morgan has never seen the woman before and she can’t understand what would cause a person to give away her child and take her own life.

When the police question Morgan, she discovers none of the witnesses can corroborate her version of events. And when they learn Morgan longs for a baby of her own, she becomes a suspect.

To prove her innocence, Morgan frantically tries to retrace the last days of the woman’s life. She begins to understand that Nicole Markham believed she and her baby were in danger. Now Morgan might be in danger, too.

Was Nicole a new mother struggling with paranoia?

Or was something much darker going on?

Pulse-pounding, heartrending, shocking, thrilling. This is one book you won’t be able to stop thinking about.

Review:

This psychological thriller by Samantha M Bailey was a fun, page turning book that definitely kept me on the edge.
The story alternates between Morgan in the present, who has just had a baby thrust at her by a stranger in the subway station who then proceeds to jump, or was it pushed?, into on oncoming train and is killed. The woman implores Morgan to take care of and love her baby. Morgan, who has struggles of her own, wants nothing more than a baby and is instantly bonded to this one, determined to protect it.
The alternating story is Nicole in the past. She is the woman in the subway with the baby. We follow her descent into paranoia and learn why she made such a desperate decision.
However, along the way, there are many unexpected twists and turns. I loved how the characters developed and found Nicole’s postpartum struggles well done. Occasionally, I found Morgan a bit predictable and frustrating, but also liked how he wasn’t going to leave her fate up to anyone else.
The author did a great job weaving together past and present to bring the characters together on the train platform on that fateful day. Definitely a thriller that kept me guessing.
Thank you to Netgalley and Simon & Schuster for the review copy of this book.

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Book Review: The Dream House

The Dream House by Jess Ryder

It’s everything she’s ever wanted …

When I first set eyes on Westhill House with its breath-taking views of the sea I knew Jack and I could make this our forever home.

It may be falling apart with an overgrown garden, but with some tender loving care, we can repair this beautiful building and perhaps our relationship too …

But the more time I spend renovating our new house, the more time Jack is spending at work.

At least Lori is here to keep me company.

She has her own troubles yet she always listens to mine.

She’s helping to restore the house, uncovering its secrets one by one.

Like the children’s drawings under the wallpaper in the back bedroom.

The hidden papers underneath the floorboards in the turret room.

And the fact that Westhill House is a place women used to go to feel safe …

Lori seems to know a lot about Westhill House.

The question is, why?

A gripping, spine-chilling read brimming with secrets and lies. If you loved The Girl on the Train, The Wife Between Us or The Woman in the Window then this dark, twisting psychological thriller from Amazon chart bestseller Jess Ryder is guaranteed to have you gripped.
Previously titled THE GUEST.

Review:
Ryder does a wonderful job in this domestic thriller about Stella, who finds her dream house and is fixing it up only to have her whole life unravel in the process.
The story is told from Stella’s point of view (in the present), and Kay’s (in the past). The house that Stella buys was once a woman’s refuge and it’s history becomes a part of the story, almost like it is another character.
When Lori appears on her doorstep one night, an obviously abused woman who believes the house is still a refuge, Stella takes her in, wanting to do the right thing. But we soon learn that something is not quite right as the story of the house past and present unfold in a chilling way.
This was a real page-turner and I was anxious to find out Stella’s, Lori’s, and Kay’s stories. There are secrets and lies, great twists, and anxious moments in this well written psychological thriller.
One of the major themes of the book is domestic violence and Ryder is very respectful and does a great job in her portrayal. She even explains at the end how she was careful not to put in anything gratuitous and even includes references for women needing support themselves.
Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for a review copy of this book.
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Book Review: The Lost Night

The Lost Night by Andrea Bartz

What really happened the night Edie died? Ten years later, her best friend Lindsay will learn how unprepared she is for the truth.

In 2009, Edie had New York’s social world in her thrall. Mercurial and beguiling, she was the shining star of a group of recent graduates living in a Brooklyn loft and treating the city like their playground. When Edie’s body was found near a suicide note at the end of a long, drunken night, no one could believe it. Grief, shock, and resentment scattered the group and brought the era to an abrupt end.

A decade later, Lindsay has come a long way from the drug-addled world of Calhoun Lofts. She has devoted best friends, a cozy apartment, and a thriving career as a magazine’s head fact-checker. But when a chance reunion leads Lindsay to discover an unsettling video from that hazy night, she starts to wonder if Edie was actually murdered—and, worse, if she herself was involved. As she rifles through those months in 2009—combing through case files, old technology, and her fractured memories—Lindsay is forced to confront the demons of her own violent history to bring the truth to light.

Review:
For me, this book was only okay. I didn’t love Lindsay and I don’t love books with lots of partying and drinking that result in memory loss. The detective work was interesting while Lindsay is trying to piece together what happened the night her friend died and I did like the story well enough to keep reading and find out the ending.  Overall, however, this just wasn’t the book for me.
Thank you to Netgalley for a review copy of this book.
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