Book Review: Bird Box

Bird Box by Josh Malerman

Something is out there, something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse of it, and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from.

Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remains, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, she has dreamed of fleeing to a place where they might be safe. Now that the boy and girl are four, it’s time to go, but the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat—blindfolded—with nothing to rely on but her wits and the children’s trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. Something is following them all the while, but is it man, animal, or monster?

Interweaving past and present, Bird Box is a snapshot of a world unraveled that will have you racing to the final page.

Review:
I tore through this book in 2 sittings as I could hardly put it down. I loved how creepy it was in a non-gory way. The psychological aspect was compelling and built the tension perfectly.
Malorie is a great character and I love how we come to feel for her and feel the absolute pain of the decisions that she feels forced to make in this horrific situation. She had to act in ways that were terrible and against everything that most people would expect they would ever have to do, but she was doing the best that she could with what she had, including emotional reserves. It is always hard to have children as characters in a horror novel, but I think that the author did a great job here, using them to show how completely dire the situation was rather than victimizing them.
The book, in some ways, is slow in that there is not that much actual action, but it is the tension that is wonderful and had me racing to turn the pages. I love a book with a thoughtful, strong, fallible heroine and this one did not disappoint.
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Book Review: Good Me, Bad Me

Good Me, Bad Me

Good Me Bad Me is dark, compelling, voice-driven psychological suspense by debut author Ali Land.

How far does the apple really fall from the tree?

Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter.

Review:

 

Good Me, Bad Me is quite a book. Not only is the subject matter intense, but the writing adds to this tension with its terse and poignant turns of phrase, and the way connections are made without spelling everything out. It is the story of Milly, whose mother is a serial killer and how abused she was whole life. One day, Millie can’t take it any more so she turns her mother in to the police.

 

This book is an exploration of Milly and how she thinks and acts, especially given her past. She wants to do good things and be good, but she also has it in her to be bad. Her thoughts and actions are intense and horrible sometimes and feel authentic given what she’d been through. There is a type of nature versus nurture dichotomy, and huge tension over which one will win.

 

Throughout the book, we certainly feel for Milly, but we also know that something is wrong. Her thoughts are honest and raw, so I found I didn’t want to get too close to her, but I was completely fascinated by her.

 

Personally, I was totally enthralled and couldn’t stop turning the pages, though it did get so intense at one point that I had to have a little break. If you like psychological thrillers, I would highly recommend this book.

 

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