On Re-Reading Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Harry Potter #3)

Harry Potter’s third year at Hogwarts is full of new dangers. A convicted murderer, Sirius Black, has broken out of Azkaban prison, and it seems he’s after Harry. Now Hogwarts is being patrolled by the dementors, the Azkaban guards who are hunting Sirius. But Harry can’t imagine that Sirius or, for that matter, the evil Lord Voldemort could be more frightening than the dementors themselves, who have the terrible power to fill anyone they come across with aching loneliness and despair. Meanwhile, life continues as usual at Hogwarts. A top-of-the-line broom takes Harry’s success at Quidditch, the sport of the Wizarding world, to new heights. A cute fourth-year student catches his eye. And he becomes close with the new Defense of the Dark Arts teacher, who was a childhood friend of his father. Yet despite the relative safety of life at Hogwarts and the best efforts of the dementors, the threat of Sirius Black grows ever closer. But if Harry has learned anything from his education in wizardry, it is that things are often not what they seem. Tragic revelations, heartwarming surprises, and high-stakes magical adventures await the boy wizard in this funny and poignant third installment of the beloved series.
Review:
This is one of my favourite Harry Potter books and it was so much fun to discuss it in my book club recently. Rowling is certainly bringing in more of the dark aspects of the wizarding world in this installment.
I find it fascinating how Rowling brings in so many important themes into her writing, such as discrimination and wrongful convictions without proper investigation and evidence — there is an almost World War 2 feel to some of what went on in the wizarding world under Voldemort. And then there are the dementors themselves and the fact that the wizarding world is alright partnering up with them, emphasizing again how everything is not always wonderful in the world of magic.
There are also great themes around friendship in this book. Harry and his friends argue and act moodily, just like regular teenagers. And then there is the friendship of Harry’s parents, their friends and their dynamic, and how they bullied Snape. The good and bad of being friends is explored.
Overall, I loved the pacing and the tension and the humour in The Prisoner of Azkaban. There is so much adventure and looming peril that it is hard not to get completely engrossed.

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On Re-Reading The Chamber of Secrets

On Re-Reading The Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Harry Potter #2)

The Dursleys were so mean and hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But just as he’s packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

And strike it does. For in Harry’s second year at Hogwarts, fresh torments and horrors arise, including an outrageously stuck-up new professor, Gilderoy Lockhart, a spirit named Moaning Myrtle who haunts the girls’ bathroom, and the unwanted attentions of Ron Weasley’s younger sister, Ginny. But each of these seem minor annoyances when the real trouble begins, and someone, or something, starts turning Hogwarts students to stone. Could it be Draco Malfoy, a more poisonous rival than ever? Could it possibly be Hagrid, whose mysterious past is finally told? Or could it be the one everyone at Hogwarts most suspects: Harry Potter himself?

My Thoughts on Re-Reading (not really a review…)

I can’t even remember how long ago I first read this book — I think it was close to the time when it came out, and I haven’t re-read it since. But this year my local library is doing a Book Geeks Book Club for adults and we are reading all of the Harry Potter books. Last month was The Chamber of Secrets.

Again, I was blown away by how much pre-planning Rowling did when she wrote her books. She really knew where they were going as was able to pepper in details that become important in later books.

One of the things I loved about this book was the change in tone. The Philosopher’s Stone was full of discovery and magic and everything (pretty much) was wonderful. But The Chamber of Secrets shows a darker side to the wizarding world: we find out about house elves, Azkaban, Kncckturn Alley, the prejudice against mudbloods and squibs, and the history of the Chamber of Secrets. This is also a book where Harry doesn’t feel at home at Hogwarts anymore. He is miserable at home and now he is miserable at school with people avoiding him and making fun of him. This is a fantastic turn of events and adds more depth to the wizarding world.

I thoroughly enjoyed re-reading this book and can see again how kids (and grown ups) fall in love with this series — and how current it is twenty years later.

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Summer 2017 Newsletter

Hello Everyone,

Happy Summer!!! I hope everyone is well and safe. Here in BC we have been hit with hot weather and forest fires, but I am proud to be part of a city that has stepped up to welcome thousands who have been displaced from their homes.The huge outpouring of kindness is inspiring.

Kick-Butt Princess Book Sale

I am excited to be taking part in a huge, multi author book sale for the week of July 17-21. Click on the image above to be taken to a page of authors who have written kick butt princess books, all of which are on sale for $.99 or are free. Now is the time to stock up on your summer reading of amazing, strong heroines who do the saving. You’ll find Prophecy there for $.99. I can’t wait to check them out myself.

Art in the Park:

On Canada Day, my writing group Books in the Belfry (you can find out more about us here on our web page), were fortunate enough to have a booth at our local Art in the Park. It was a fantastic, sunny day, filled with people coming to talk with us about books and writing. Thanks to everyone who stopped by.

Betrayed:

I’ve been spending most of my writing time these days polishing off my adult novel set in ancient Greece during the time of the Trojan War, Betrayed. I really love this book and can’t wait to finish it — it is about Queen Clytemnestra, twin sister to Helen of Troy. It combines my love of Greek myth with a phenomenal heroine and lots of strong emotions. It’s been a bit of a roller coaster to write, but well worth it.

New Writing Practice:

For those of you who are writers, I wanted to share a new writing practice that I’ve adopted that I am having some fun with. It is called “copywriting.” Basically, before writing every day, I sit and physically copy out a page or two from someone else’s work in an effort to learn new ways of writing. It’s actually something writer’s have been doing for a long time and something painters do — copy the masters. You can read my blog post about it here. I was in the mood for Thoreau’s essay On Civil Disobedience, so I’m starting with that. I also think it would be a fantastic way to get into the rhythm of poetry. So far I find it a great calming and centering exercise.

What I’m Reading:

Besides loading up my Kindle with Kick-Butt Princess books, I’ve been branching out in my reading this summer and I’m in the mood for thrillers. I’ve just started The Bone Labyrinth by James Rollins and it’s amazing so far. Does anyone have any other good recommendations — not too gory, though.

Well, that’s it for now. Hope you are enjoying your summer,
Take care,
Coreena McBurnie

 

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Free Prophecy Colouring Pages

I was playing around on my computer and figured out how to make the cover of my book, Prophecy, into a colouring page. In fact, several colouring pages. Here they are, so feel free to download. The reason that there are several is because of Antigone’s hair — in most of my attempts to make a colouring page, her hair just turns into a big white area. So I had an idea. I ran the cover through several different filters on a free app called Dreamscope (completely addictive, by the way), until I found some likely results. Then I took that image and ran it through another free program called Rapid Resizer that has a Free Picture Stencil Maker. This is what I came up with!

 

And, just for fun, I found a few images related to my book and made those into colouring pages too.

Here is King Oedipus contemplating the Sphinx’s riddle:

Here is Antigone and her sister, Ismene:

And here is Antigone with her father, Oedipus:

If anyone else tries this, I’d love to see the results, along with any completed colouring projects.

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