Book Review: Good Me, Bad Me

Good Me, Bad Me

Good Me Bad Me is dark, compelling, voice-driven psychological suspense by debut author Ali Land.

How far does the apple really fall from the tree?

Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter.

Review:

 

Good Me, Bad Me is quite a book. Not only is the subject matter intense, but the writing adds to this tension with its terse and poignant turns of phrase, and the way connections are made without spelling everything out. It is the story of Milly, whose mother is a serial killer and how abused she was whole life. One day, Millie can’t take it any more so she turns her mother in to the police.

 

This book is an exploration of Milly and how she thinks and acts, especially given her past. She wants to do good things and be good, but she also has it in her to be bad. Her thoughts and actions are intense and horrible sometimes and feel authentic given what she’d been through. There is a type of nature versus nurture dichotomy, and huge tension over which one will win.

 

Throughout the book, we certainly feel for Milly, but we also know that something is wrong. Her thoughts are honest and raw, so I found I didn’t want to get too close to her, but I was completely fascinated by her.

 

Personally, I was totally enthralled and couldn’t stop turning the pages, though it did get so intense at one point that I had to have a little break. If you like psychological thrillers, I would highly recommend this book.

 

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Book Review: Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

Red Clocks

Five women. One question. What is a woman for?

In this ferociously imaginative novel, abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights of life, liberty, and property to every embryo. In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom.

Ro, a single high-school teacher, is trying to have a baby on her own, while also writing a biography of Eivør, a little-known 19th-century female polar explorer. Susan is a frustrated mother of two, trapped in a crumbling marriage. Mattie is the adopted daughter of doting parents and one of Ro’s best students, who finds herself pregnant with nowhere to turn. And Gin is the gifted, forest-dwelling homeopath, or “mender,” who brings all their fates together when she’s arrested and put on trial in a frenzied modern-day witch hunt.

My Review:

When I first started to read Red Clocks, I wasn’t sure this was going to be the book for me. But then, I continued reading, and boy was I wrong!

I got a bit confused at first by the chapter changes — each chapter is from one of the four main character’s point of view and their name is never mentioned in that chapter. However, once I got to know the characters, their voices were so unique that there was no danger of confusing them.
I love the premise of the book — that in the near future (ie, anytime, really), the abortion laws in the US are repealed and embryos are granted person status, which changes everything around reproduction. Also, there’s a new law around adoption where “every child needs two”, meaning single people can no longer adopt. Red Clocks takes place just as these new laws are going into effect so that we can see their full impact.
By throwing the world into this kind of situation, combined with the story of the 19th century Icelandic Arctic explorer, Elivor. Zumas is able to explore the concept of motherhood from many different angles in a fascinating and thoughtful way. By about mid way through the book, I couldn’t put it down and just had to finish.
NOTE: I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley.

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Book Badass and a Chance to Win

Hello Everyone,

I am in the process of starting a new business with my dear friend, Tara Pastro, called Book Badass. Book Badass is a monthly book box subscription service. Each box includes a new book paired with several items to enhance reading the book and make it more fun.

 

Our mission is to share and promote badass books, meaning books where women are strong protagonists and stand up for themselves; where they keep going against the odds; where they encourage us, in their own way, to see the value in ourselves and or others; books have themes that push our boundaries; or authors who are badasses themselves. These books may be inspirational, tragic, funny, sad, or magical and will be represented in genres.

 

We are at the market research stage of our business plan and would love your help by filling out our short survey. As a thank you, you will be entered into a draw for a free box! Thank you in advance for your help, and please feel free to share our survey with your friends.

Click here for a link to the survey.

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Book Badass

Book Badass

Hello to all of my book-loving friends,

This is a shameless self-promoting blog post for a new venture I have embarked on with some friends. Its’ so much fun and I’m really excited about this!

If you’ve read my blog or my book, Prophecy, then you know that I love, absolutely adore, badass main characters, especially the female ones who can take care of themselves or go against what is expected in order to remain true to themselves.

That’s where this new business fits it. It’s called Book Badass, It’s a book box subscription with a difference — each month we select a badass book to highlight. What is a badass book? It’s a book with kick ass protagonists who can save themselves, daring themes, books that make us think, or take us out of our comfort zones and push our boundaries. Books you stay up reading all night because you can’t put them down. These books may be inspirational, tragic, funny, sad, or magical. Or all of those. Always, the books we choose have spoken to us, lingered with us even after we’ve turned the last page.

We are pairing these books with several items that compliment or enhance your reading experience — and all delivered to your door every month.

And wait until you read January’s selectionEleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman. This book will make you laugh and make you cry. Eleanor is an endearing badass who’s lack of social skills mean that she doesn’t mince words or suffer fools. She’s literally walked through the flames and has survived. Join us in the new year as we cozy up to this remarkable debut novel from Gail Honeyman. The rest of this box’s contents are still secret for now.

Murder on the Orient Express Badass Specialty Box.

We also have Specialty Boxes with a current book and several items that set you up for a luxurious reading experience.

These boxes make a great gift for you or for the book-loving people in your life.

Our website is BookBadass.com. And if you sign up for our newsletter, you will receive a coupon for 10% off your first order.

Thanks for letting me share this exciting new business with you!

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