Author Interview: Anna J. Adams

Today I am happy to introduce author Anna J. Adams to my blog.

Lane_Changes_Cover_FiverrTell us about your book. Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?

LANE CHANGES is the first in a series of books and is out right now.

The first one begins with Lane Meyers, Rob Holland, Samuel Seeley and friends who are high school seniors. Rob is a new student, a foster child of a local doctor and his wife, and when Lane sees him it’s love at first sight, although she doesn’t realize that yet.

Sam has known Lane since seventh grade and has been annoying her since and now begins to pick on Rob as well. As all of this is happening, Lane is trying to figure out who is leaving unwanted gifts in her locker, at her house and these soon escalate into bigger incidents as the year comes to an end. She is sure it isn’t Rob, not sure if it’s Sam or someone else. As she is dealing with trying to obtain a swimming scholarship, a fellow student who miscarries, a new boyfriend, college looming…she feels like she is going to crack under the stress.

Basically, she is dealing with many scenarios real students have to work through and as she does this, she realizes who really cares for her and who was just using her. Read more

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Author Interview: Renee Scattergood

Today I am happy to introduce author Renee Scattergood. I was able to interview one of her characters, Makari, which you can read here.

Renee Scattergood's Bio PicTell us about your books. Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?

Right now I’m working on my Shadow Stalker serial. It’s about a young shadow stalker, Auren, who is being hunted by Drevin, Emperor of the Galvadi, who claims she will enslave the people of their world. Auren is trying to end his tyranny while trying to avoid his prophecy.

What genre(s) do you write in? Who is your audience?

I write dark fantasy for young adults over 15 year old and adults.

Tell us about your writing process. How do you fuel your writing?

I always start with a character. I develop the main character and the story comes from that. Once I have a general idea of what the story will be about, I start writing down ideas. Then I organize the ideas into a basic plot. Usually by that point, I know about how long the story will be and I can start breaking down the main plot into smaller plotlines to figure out how many books it will take to write out the entire story. Then I start planning the individual books. I write out the scenes and develop a timeline. Once I work out how it all fits together and have the scenes in the right order, I separate it into chapters. The last step before writing is putting together a detailed outline. This makes the writing go more smoothly and allows me to work out any final kinks and details in the story, which saves time with editing later. Once the story is written, I do my self-edits and then I sent it off to my editor. Read more

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Author Interview: Cecily Wolfe

Today I am happy to introduce author Cecily Wolfe to my blog. (I also interviewed the character Claud from this book, which you can read here.)


starsTell us about your book(s). Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?
“A Harvest of Stars” will be released on June 7 as an e-book on Amazon and Smashwords. It is the story of childhood friends Locklyn and Isaiah, who met on the school bus on the first day of kindergarten and have bonded over Isaiah’s patience with Locklyn’s defiance and tough persona, which is a cover for the abuse she suffers at the hand of her stepfather. As they near the end of high school, Isaiah realizes that his love for her, which is obvious to everyone except Lock, means that he can longer stand by and allow the consistent abuse to go on. Helping her, and helping her to help herself, means that both of them, along with Lock’s dying mother, may all be in danger.


How do you come up with the ideas for your writing?
I have vivid dreams, and have had them since childhood. I often have very disturbing nightmares, which may be why I lean towards writing darker stories with characters who either have emotional troubles or have to deal with characters who have such issues. I daydream a lot, as well. Oh, reading everything I can get my hands on helps as well. Sometimes a word looks particularly interesting to me for some reason I can’t figure at the time, and I write it down, and eventually it works its way into a character’s personality or a story. For instance, I saw the word “tithe” yesterday in some capacity, and wrote it down. Not sure why, but I think there is a short story coming from that direction.
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Author Interview: Laurisa White Reyes

Today I am happy to introduce author Laurisa White Reyes. Her new book is The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction and sounds great — and I got a chance to review her book, which you can read here.
P10 (2)Tell us about your book(s). Is there one in particular you are promoting right now? What is it about?
The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction had its start when I taught creative writing to middle grade and high school students. I wasn’t thrilled with the writing books available for kids at the time, so I created my own curriculum. Fast forward a decade. I’ve written and published several novels for young readers, including Spark Award winner The Storytellers. As an author, I’ve the opportunity to visit over 60 schools and speak with hundreds of students about writing and creativity. I decided that I wanted to reach out to young writers everywhere, and The Kids’ Guide to Writing Fiction was the result.
Geared toward kids aged 10 – 17, the book is not just for those who already love writing, but it is also designed to spark an interest in reading and writing in kids whose academic strengths and talents lie elsewhere. By introducing the six fundamental building blocks of storytelling in a fun and easy-to-“get” manner, kids discover the storyteller that lies within each of us. Their confidence and enthusiasm grow as they see the inner-workings of their very own stories grow.

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