Spring Writing Newsletter & Free Ebook

Hello Everyone,

I am sorry for my long absence, but I am happy to be back now. As many of you know, I experience mental illness and this last year has been a bit rough; however things are looking up.

International Woman’s Day & Free Book
March 8th is International Woman’s Day!!! How great is that? I was trying to find a way to celebrate and wanted to offer my book, Prophecy, for free that day. In the synchronicity of the universe, I received an email yesterday from Smashwords about an opportunity to enroll my book in a one week sale from March 5-March 11 for Read an Ebook Week! So, now, to receive a FREE ecopy of Prophecy in the format of your choice, all you have to do is go to Smashwords and use this coupon code: SFREE and it’s yours — and Prophecy has a fun, strong, stand up for herself heroine, perfect for International Woman’s Day. There are also hundreds of other books on sale or free this week, so it’s a good time to check them out. If you don’t have a Smashwords account, it’s easy and free to get one. And, if do get a book, please pay it forward and leave a review. Also, feel free to share this with friends.

What I’m Working on Now & Kickstarter Campaign
Currently, I’m working on my historical/mythological fiction called Betrayed, which is the story of Clytemnestra (Helen of Troy’s twin sister). Clytemnestra has been villianized throughout history, so I am telling her side of the story, getting behind her famous murder of her husband. This book is definitely not YA oriented and I’m enjoying the change of pace.

I’ve decided to do a Kickstarter for Betrayed in the upcoming months and am planning to publish it this fall — I am finalizing the details and am working on some fun rewards, and will let you all know when it’s ready. I need a bit of help for editing and production costs. Wait until you see the cover that a friend of mine designed. It is simply stunning, I mean, really beautiful. I have no other word for it. It’s not quite finished, but I’ll reveal it when it’s ready. The image above isn’t the cover, but isn’t it an amazing painting of Clytemnestra with her knife after murdering her husband?

What I’m Reading
Right now, I’m immersed in the short stories of Ray Bradbury. I can’t believe I’ve waited this long to read them! I knew he was a master storyteller, but these are timeless. I’m being whisked away to the future and other worlds and am loving it.

However, I’m always on the lookout for new books to read. In the spirit of International Woman’s Day, does anyone have any recommendations for books with amazing heroines? I can easily recommend the Graceling series by Kristin Cashore.

The snow is melting in my corner of the world and it looks like the tulips might even come up soon. I hope everyone is enjoying some nice sunshine and spring weather.

Coreena

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Book Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Parts One and Two (Harry Potter, #8)

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

Review:
I was so excited to get this book when it came out and I wanted to love it so much, but I have to say I didn’t. I didn’t exactly hate it either because it was missing that Harry Potter magic that we’ve all come to expect from this series.
It was fun to delve into a play, something I hadn’t done in quite awhile, which also made it a quick read. I enjoyed visualizing what the scenes would look like on the stage — and according to the stage directions, the play must be spectacular.
But I did find the story lacking. I don’t want to spoil anything, but the whole story was missing a major villain, someone the reader could really hate, someone along the lines of Voldemort. There was an antagonist, but they just didn’t seem evil enough for the Harry Potter universe.
The other strange thing was the lack of magic.
Also, I wasn’t thrilled with the relationship between Harry and his son. It just felt wrong. Harry knew what it was like not to fit in and be bullied and yet he seemed to have very little sympathy for his own son.
My favourite characters in the story, by far, is Draco Malfoy, followed closely by Ron Weasley.
Overall, I did enjoy The Cursed Child, but found it lacking at the same time.

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Book Review: The Name of the Wind

name of the windThe Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle #1)

Told in Kvothe’s own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen.

The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as a fugitive after the murder of a king form a gripping coming-of-age story unrivaled in recent literature.

A high-action story written with a poet’s hand, The Name of the Wind is a masterpiece that will transport readers into the body and mind of a wizard.

Review:
 I can see why so many people love this book. When I heard about it recently, I tried to take it out of the library, but the waiting list was months, if not over a year long. Then a friend lent me a copy and I dove into his huge volume.
And it was so much fun.
The Name of the Wind is the first day of Kvothe telling the story of his life. We get to hear all about his childhood and young adult years — his adventures and and glimmerings into background for some of his famous and infamous deeds.
Kvothe’s world is one of magic and fantasy, and where the harsh realities of a young boy on his own tug at our heartstrings. I immediately loved Kvothe and his mysterious character.
Then, there is Rothfuss’ writing. He has an amazing way with words. I also found it somewhat ironic that he could succinctly and vividly describe things in a few words, yet this is such a long book.
I’d easily recommend this book to anyone who enjoys an action packed fantasy, and I can’t wait to get my hands on Book 2 to see where the adventure leads.

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Zeus

I’ve been working hard on getting healthier, and one of the things I’ve been doing is reading Writing the Natural Way by Gabriele Rico, as well as doing the exercises. I highly recommend this book, by the way — lots of deceptively simple exercises and information about how the brain works. I thought it would be fun to start sharing some of these poems here on my blog.

Today I wrote a poem following the structure of another poem, in this case, Portrait VIII by e.e. cummings. His poem was about Buffalo Bill. I’ve chosen Zeus from ancient Greek myth.

Zeus

 

Zeus is

     king

     who can take any form

     to seduce whoever strikes his

          fancy

     and wield onetwothreefourfive thunderbolts

          justlikethat

     By the gods!

he was powerful

          once

          sitting on his throne in Olympus

               governing all

but where is he

Now?

 

 

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