Book Review: The McAvoy Sisters Book of Secrets

The McAvoy Sisters Book of Secrets by Molly Fader

What drove their family apart just might bring them back together… It’s been seventeen years since the tragic summer the McAvoy sisters fell apart. Lindy, the wild one, left home, carved out a new life in the city and never looked back. Delia, the sister who stayed, became a mother herself, raising her daughters and running the family shop in their small Pennsylvania hometown on the shores of Lake Erie. But now, with their mother’s ailing health and a rebellious teenager to rein in, Delia has no choice but to welcome Lindy home. As the two sisters try to put their family back in order, they finally have the chance to reclaim what’s been lost over the years: for Delia, professional dreams and a happy marriage, and for Lindy, a sense of home and an old flame–and best of all, each other. But when one turbulent night leads to a shocking revelation, the women must face the past they’ve avoided for a decade. And there’s nothing like an old secret to bring the McAvoy women back together and stronger than ever.With warm affection and wry wit, Molly Fader’s The McAvoy Sisters Book of Secrets is about the ties that bind family and the power of secrets to hold us back or set us free.
Review:
This was a sweet, light read that I quite enjoyed. The book has alternating points of view and flashbacks to the past, but centres around estranged sisters, Lindy and Delia. Lindy left their small town at an early age, even though she had planned on staying and running the family fish store. Delia stayed though she had wished to leave and go traveling and then university. I liked each woman in her own way and was rooting for them to reconcile through the whole book.
The author did a good job in creating the tension in the family, then slowly dispelling it through understanding and revelations. I like how the generations were brought in, namely their mother and Delia’s daughter.
The mother was a fantastic character, a once sharp woman who’d had a stroke and was now having troubles with her memory. She was both foggy and sharp, but her (now) no nonsense approach was fun and her flashbacks of joys and regrets were authentic sounding.
The romances in the book were nice and not overdone — they added to rather than took away from or overpowered the story of the sisters and the family that was learning to heal.
Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for a review copy of this book.
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