Book Review: Six of Crows

Six of Crows (Six of Crows #1)

Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can’t pull it off alone…

A convict with a thirst for revenge.

A sharpshooter who can’t walk away from a wager.

A runaway with a privileged past.

A spy known as the Wraith.

A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums.

A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes.

Kaz’s crew are the only ones who might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

Review:
First off, it is impossible to talk about this book without commenting on how physically beautiful it is. And, because I initially picked this book up because of how it looks, I’ll start there. Six of Crows is stunning. The cover art immediately draws you in, then you pick it up and see that the three outer edges of the pages are coloured mat black. Opening the book, the end papers are a crimson red. The font is lovely, and the illustrations for the chapter headings mirrors the cover. This is one book where it really is worth reading the physical hardback copy.
Then there’s the story, which is fantastic. This is the first in a companion series set in the Grisha world, a world where Bardugo immediately draws you into its harsh and brutal world. You don’t need to read Bardugo’s first series to appreciate this one.
In Six of Crows, Kaz is a mobster type criminal genius who takes on an impossible job — rescue someone from a prison that no one has escaped from in the middle on an impenetrable fortress. But the pay and prestige is too much for Kaz, so he gets together his crew and the six of them tackle the challenge.
I enjoyed all six of the main characters in this book. They each had their own motives for their actions, even when they went against each other or the bigger picture. The story is told so that we are in the head of a different character in different chapters, so the reader really gets to connect with them. Each one is likable in their own way and despicable in their ow way.
I loved this book — the world drew me in, and it was filled with action, magic, conflict, drama, and great characters.

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